Hyperpolarization Summary

This summer I set out to get a previously existing parahydrogen hyperpolarization setup to work on a single-sided magnet (see previous posts for a more in-depth explanation of what those words mean). The biggest obstacle to achieving my goal was the production of parahydrogen. Our catalyst setup at the start was not functioning, but after some […]

Hyperpolarization Update #7 (Well, that worked)

This is the first clear hyperpolarized measurement we took on the single-sided NMR. (This is a picture from my phone because we were having technical difficulties with saving single-scan data.) Compare to the second figure.

A quick recap: I’m troubleshooting a setup to do hyperpolarization, a technique that allows us to take much faster measurements of chemical samples using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance, which uses magnets and radio pulses to give you information about chemicals, think MRI) . Hyperpolarization speeds up measurements because it increases the amount of signal you pick […]

Hyperpolarization Update #6 (I hyperpolarized a thing!)

The black line shows what the signal looks like before the sample is hyperpolarized, and the red line shows what the signal looks like after the sample is hyperpolarized. Notice that for each of the humps on the black line there is a much larger dip in the red line. (Hyperpolarization flips the sign of the signal so the bump goes down instead of up, but the important thing is that the bump is bigger.)

A quick recap: I’m troubleshooting a setup to do hyperpolarization, a technique that allows us to take much faster measurements of chemical samples using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance, which uses magnets and radio pulses to give you information about chemicals, think MRI) . Hyperpolarization speeds up measurements because it increases the amount of signal you pick […]